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  • 23 Apr 2016 5:22 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Oxford University Press is pleased to offer North American Kant Society members an exclusive 30% discount on all titles. Take advantage of this exclusive discount by entering promo-code AAFLYG6 at checkout when purchasing books from global.oup.com/philosophy

  • 23 Apr 2016 5:16 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The 2016-17 Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant Lecturer is Beatrice Longueness (New York University). Longueness will present her lecture at the 2017 Eastern Division meeting of the APA in Baltimore.

    De Gruyter has a long history of publishing Kant scholarship and embraces philosophical work in the Kantian tradition in the broadest sense. The de Gruyter Stiftung explicitly intends the Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant lecture series to be open to a broad approach to Kantian philosophy across the philosophical disciplines. This may also include contemporary philosophical work in the Kantian tradition. The Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant lecture series is offered every year at a divisional meeting on a rotating basis.

    More information about Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant Lecturer can be found here:

    http://www.apaonline.org/?kant

  • 15 Dec 2015 10:48 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    NAKS is very happy to announce that the winner of the 2015 NAKS Markus Herz Award Naomi Fischer.

    Naomi recently defended her dissertation, entitled "Kant, Schelling, and a New Philosophy of Nature" at the University of Notre Dame. Her dissertation explores themes of the the activity, nature, and cognition in Kant and Schelling, and applies lessons learned from this period to contemporary philosophical debates. She will receive her degree in January 2016, and beginning in Fall 2016 she will be an Assistant Professor at Clark University. 

    Abstract: "Kant on Animals"

    Kant’s Critical philosophy seems to leave very little room for accounting for the mental lives of animals, since the understanding is required for experience and cognition. While Kant does not regard animals as Cartesian machines, he leaves them very little resources for getting around in the world in a coherent and responsive way. In this paper I present Kant’s account of animal minds. According to this picture, animals have representations of which they are not conscious, and these representations can give rise to inclinations through a form of reflection. While this account is impressive in its ingenuity, and it clarifies the role of various faculties and terms in the critical philosophy, it is ultimately unsatisfactory in accounting for the variety and complexity of animal behavior, as well as the gradual emergence of rationality. 

  • 24 Sep 2015 3:59 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The North American Kant Society is pleased to announce the seventh  annual Wilfrid Sellars Essay Prize competition. This prize will be awarded for the best essay on any topic that demonstrates the continued relevance of Kant’s philosophy. Essays must be single-authored, previously unpublished (work under consideration or forthcoming will be considered), and cannot exceed 8,000 words in length (including notes).

    The Wilfrid Sellars Essay Prize is the natural continuation of the existing Markus Herz Prize, which is awarded to the best graduate student submission to the NAKS study groups. The intention behind the Wilfrid Sellars Essay Prize is to help promote original Kantian or Kant-inspired philosophical work of scholars in the early stages of their careers. Submissions will be blind-reviewed and judged by members of a review committee drawn from the NAKS Executive and Advisory Boards.

    Deadline of submission: January 15, 2016.Wil

    Eligibility rules:

    ·        The essay must be written in English, single-authored, and has not been published by January 15, 2016.

    ·        “Junior” is defined here as: “PhD in hand; and 40 or younger (regardless of tenure status), or non-tenured (regardless of age).”

    ·        Authors must be members of NAKS at the time of submission.

    Please send entries electronically to:

    Pablo Muchnik

    (pablo_muchnik@emerson.edu).

    Entries should be submitted in Wordformat and state the word count at the end. Submissions must be accompanied by a cover letter containing a three-part declaration stating that: (i) the essay has not been published by January 15, 2016, (ii) the author already has a PhD in hand, and is either 40 years of age or younger (regardless of employment status) or non-tenured (regardless of age), and (iii) the author is a member of NAKS in good standing.

    The winner will be announced on June 15 and will receive a prize of $500.  The Award Committee reserves the right not to award a prize, if in its judgment none is warranted.

  • 24 Sep 2015 3:56 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    NAKS is pleased to anounce the third (now annual) Book Prize for Senior Scholars competition. This prize will be awarded for an outstanding book dealing with any aspect of Kant’s philosophy. Submissions will be judged by a panel consisting of members drawn from the NAKS Advisory Board, and the winner will receive a prize of $500. Deadline for submissions: December 31, 2015 (for books published from January 1 through December 31, 2015). The Awards Committee reserves the right not to award a prize, if in its judgment none is warranted. 

    Eligibility rules:

    1.)   Only single-authored monographs or collections of essays written in English will be considered.

    2.)   Authors must be members of NAKS at the time of submission.

    3.)   Senior" is defined here as: "40 or older (regardless of tenure status), or tenured (regardless of age).”

    4.)   Current NAKS Executive and/or Advisory Board Members are not eligible to compete for the prize.

    5.)   Submission must be made by the publisher, and four (4) copies of the book must be submitted to NAKS, via:

    Prof. Pablo Muchnik

    Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    Emerson College

    120 Boylston Street, 9th Floor (#907)

    Boston, MA 02116-4624.

  • 24 Sep 2015 3:35 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    NAKS is very happy to announce that the winner of the 2015 NAKS Book Prize is Julian Wuerth, author of Kant on Mind, Action, & Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2014).

    Julian Wuerth is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. He earned his BA from the University of Chicago in 1993 and his PhD from the University of Pennsylviania in 2000. His publications include “Kant’s Immediatism, Pre-Critique,” Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2006); “The Paralogisms of Pure Reason,” The Cambridge Companion to Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (2010); “Sense and Sensibility in Kant’s Practical Agent: Against the Intellectualism of Korsgaard and Sidgwick,” European Journal of Philosophy; and Kant on Mind, Action, and Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2014). He co-edited, with Lawrence Jost, Perfecting Virtue: New Essays on Kantian Ethics and Virtue Ethics (Cambridge University Press, 2011).  He is at work on What Should I Do?: Kant’s Ethics, for the five-book Routledge series, Kant’s Questions.  He is also editing The Cambridge Kant Lexicon.

    In Kant on Mind, Action, and Ethics, Wuerth offers radically new conclusions about Kant’s Critical philosophy that are grounded in striking new evidence drawn from across a broad range of sources from Kant’s philosophical corpus.  Wuerth argues that as the author of a Copernican revolution in philosophy, Kant famously grounds his philosophy in his account of the self. More than two centuries later, however, his account of the self remains a mystery.  Unsurprisingly, this has frustrated progress in interpretations of key areas of his philosophy: his transcendental idealism, his philosophy as a system, his rejection of rational psychology, his theory of action, and, of course, his ethics.  

    Wuerth begins with an examination of Kant’s ontology of the self. Here he traces key developments in Kant’s account of substance, his transcendental idealism, and his rejection of rational psychology across Kant’s published and unpublished recorded thought before, in, and after the Critique. Against traditional interpretations, Wuerth also argues that Kant’s considered view is that the soul is a simple substance. But here Wuerth resists the temptation to peremptorily dismiss Kant’s view as pre-critical. He instead uncovers distinctions in meaning, rooted in Kant’s transcendental idealism, which reconcile Kant’s ontology of the self with his rejection of rational psychology. Kant is shown to single out and reject only the determinate layers of meaning of these conclusions: substance no longer implies permanence, simplicity no longer implies incorruptibility, and conclusions of our soul’s immortality are no longer forthcoming. 

    The book next turns to Kant’s notoriously difficult yet central account of the mind’s powers and their interrelations, as presented by Kant across his recorded thought. Here Wuerth provides a map of this mind. He then locates key parts of Kant’s grand system of philosophy on this map, highlighting their respective functions and interworkings.  Wuerth next underscores a key feature of this map of the mind’s powers of cognition, feeling, desire, and choice: the irreducibility of sensible and intellectual desires. That is, Kant defends the view that we have two irreducible kinds of conative currency: sensible and intellectual. With this irreducibility comes the coherence of immoral choice. And with the coherence of immoral choice comes the inviability of constructivist interpretations of Kant. Indeed, it is precisely because Kant recognizes that immoral choices are coherent that his ethics celebrates virtue, as strength of will, and that he enjoins us to develop our character and cultivate our cognitions, feelings, and desires. In keeping with Kant’s Enlightenment call to have the courage to think for ourselves, he anchors the moral law in nothing less than our recognition of its authority. Here Wuerth identifies a single, unifying strategy across Kant’s many explanations of the categorical imperative. This “Elimination of Sensibility Procedure,” as Wuerth calls it, builds on Kant’s distinction in kind between sensibility and understanding. By first systematically rejecting sensibility as the possible source of a moral law or good will, Kant isolates reason and its message, the categorical imperative.

  • 17 Jun 2015 1:13 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The 2015-2016 Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant lecturer is Onora O’Neill (University of Cambridge). O’Neill will present her lecture at the 2016 Central Division meeting in Chicago, IL.

    De Gruyter has a long history of publishing Kant scholarship and embraces philosophical work in the Kantian tradition in the broadest sense. The de Gruyter Stiftung explicitly intends the Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant lecture series to be open to a broad approach to Kantian philosophy across the philosophical disciplines. This may also include contemporary philosophical work in the Kantian tradition. The Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant lecture series is offered every year at a divisional meeting on a rotating basis.

    More information can be found here:

    http://www.apaonline.org/news/news.asp?id=230972

  • 17 Jun 2015 1:10 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The judges for the 2015 Wilfrid Sellars Essay Prize are pleased to announce that the winner for this year’s competition is Mavis Biss, author of “Kantian Moral Striving.”

    Mavis Biss completed her PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2011 and is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University Maryland. She specializes in moral philosophy, with particular focus on Kantian ethics and conceptions of moral imagination. Her recent publications include: “Radical Moral Imagination: Courage, Hope and Articulation,” Hypatia (2013), “Moral Imagination, Perception and Judgment,” The Southern Journal of Philosophy (2014), and “Empathy and Interrogation,” International Journal of Applied Philosophy (2014). Her current work deals with the ideal of moral self-perfection in Kant’s ethics and the complexities of rational agency in the face of contested moral meaning.

    Abstract for “Kant’s Moral Striving:”

    The paper focuses on a single question that highlights some of the most puzzling aspects of Kant’s explanation of the duty of moral self-perfection. What kinds of activity count as striving for purity in one’s disposition to duty or strength of will? I argue that a dominant strand of Kant’s approach to moral striving does not fit familiar models of striving. I seek to address this problem in a way that avoids the flaws of synchronic and atomistic approaches to moral self-discipline by developing an account of Kantian moral striving as an ongoing contemplative activity complexly engaged with multiple forms of self-knowledge.

    The judges for the 2015 Wilfrid Sellars Essay Prize also gave an honorable mention to Reed Winegar for his “Kant's Criticisms of Hume's Dialogues concerning Natural Religion.”

    Reed Winegar is an assistant professor of philosophy at Fordham University. He received his BA from Harvard in 2005 and his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in 2012. In 2015/16 he will be a VolkwagenStiftung/ Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the Freie Universität in Berlin. His essay "Kant's Criticisms of Hume's Dialogues concerning Natural Religion" is forthcoming in the British Journal for the History of Philosophy. Other published work has appeared (or is forthcoming) in the Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie, Hegel Bulletin, and Journal of Scottish Philosophy. His current research focuses on Kant's criticisms of metaphysics and on issues in Kant's 3rd Critique.

    Abstract for “Kant’s Criticisms of Hume’s Diaglogues concerning Natural Religion:”

    According to recent commentators, Kant agrees with Hume's Dialogues concerning Natural Religion (1) that physico-theology can never provide knowledge of God and (2) that the concept of God, nevertheless, provides a useful heuristic principle for scientific enquiry. This paper argues that Kant, far from agreeing with Hume, criticizes Hume's Dialogues for failing to prove that physico-theology can never yield knowledge of God and that Kant correctly views Hume's Dialogues as a threat to, rather than an anticipation of, his own view that the concept of God provides a useful heuristic principle for science. The paper concludes that Kant's critique of physico-theology reflects Kant's deep dissatisfaction with Hume's manner of argumentation and suggests that Kant's attempt to provide a more successful critique of physico-theology merits continued philosophical attention.

    Both essays can be found in the members-only section of our website under “Sellars Prize”.    

  • 23 May 2015 4:57 PM | Anonymous

    As members of NAKS, we are committed to promoting Kant-scholarship and Kantian philosophy in all its forms. No one who shares these basic aims should be prevented, for monetary reasons only, from joining and participating in NAKS. Yet, at the same time, as a relatively small society, we depend primarily on membership dues to support a growing number of activities and prizes. Since we have not raised dues since 2009, we decided it was time to revisit our financial structure and adopt what we believe is the most fair model for our society.

    Here are the main results of our deliberations:

    1. To maintain the current membership dues of graduate students, retired people, and the unemployed.

    2. To create a new category of members for those holding ånon-tenure track jobs to encourage and facilitate their participation.

    3. For reasons of fairness, to create a more nuanced dues structure for those holding tenure track jobs or who are already tenured.

    4. Finally, to introduce a “hardship clause” that would allow members to waive paying their dues under extenuating circumstances and for a limited period.

    Moving forward, this is the new membership structure at a glance:

    • Category 1: students, retired, or unemployed members, including all international members who fall under those descriptions.
      Dues: $10.00 per year.

    • Category 2: non-student, employed but non-tenure track members, including all international members who fall under those descriptions.
      Dues: $20.00 per year.

    • Category 3: tenure track or tenured members, with annual income up to $70,000.00, including all international members who fall under those descriptions.
      Dues: $35.00 per year.

    • Category 4: tenure track or tenured members, with annual income between $70,000.00 and $100,000.00, including all international members who fall under those descriptions.
      Dues: $40.00 per year.

    • Category 5: tenure track or tenured members, with annual income between $100,000.00 and $130,000.00, including all international members who fall under those descriptions.
      Dues: $45.00 per year.

    • Category 6: tenure track or tenured members, annual income more than $130,000.00, including all international members who fall under those descriptions.
      Dues: $50.00 per year.
  • 23 May 2015 1:23 AM | Anonymous

    We are excited to announce the third NAKS biennial meeting at Emory University on May 27-29, 2016. Our host will be Prof. Dilek Huseyinzadegan, and we are very grateful for the generous support from her department and the whole University, which is receiving us with enthusiasm and generosity. Although our national conference was supposed to take place in 2015, we decided to postpone the event for a year in order to avoid any conflict with the International Kant Congress in Vienna and increase the chances of full participation from our members in both events. Over the next few months, there will be a formal call for papers, but we wanted to share this exciting news as you make plans for the immediate and longer term future. 

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